filmskits
eye-contact:

Natural Born Killers
Submitted by perception-is-selection

eye-contact:

Natural Born Killers

Submitted by perception-is-selection

crumbargento:

Inserts

Cronenberg remarked in a 1988 Maclean’s article that the look of a typical operating room bored him to tears, explaining the colourful approach taken here.

85anti:

Pulp Fiction (1994)

85anti:

Pulp Fiction (1994)

filmghoul:

The Limey (Steven Soderbergh, 1999)

filmghoul:

The Limey (Steven Soderbergh, 1999)

Gary Oldman in one of his most indelible portrayals, as Sid Vicious in Alex Cox’s SID & NANCY (1986).

BARTON FINK illustration by Josh Gosfield,
Rolling Stone issue #611, August 22nd, 1991.

BARTON FINK illustration by Josh Gosfield,

Rolling Stone issue #611, August 22nd, 1991.

the3rdwall:

Targets

A very auspicious directorial debut from 1968.

criterionz:

this past month i’ve been swamped with helping my mother move and haven’t had much time to make any more posts — but don’t worry i have the images for the next film lined up and ready to go so i’ll be getting to them soon now that everything is over. it’s ‘Sid & Nancy’ by the…

SERIAL MOM (1994) turns twenty this year!
(Illustration by Robert Risko.)

SERIAL MOM (1994) turns twenty this year!

(Illustration by Robert Risko.)

jamesbranscome:

Scream Factory is doing a contest and here’s my entry.  Please check it out.  If you like it, please vote it up.  If don’t like, then vote it down.  

alreadyviewed:

白いドレスの女
Body Heat (1981)

From the days when there weren’t a dozen or more producer credits on a film poster…

alreadyviewed:

白いドレスの女

Body Heat (1981)

From the days when there weren’t a dozen or more producer credits on a film poster…

theartofmoviestills:

Blow-Up | Michelangelo Antonioni | 1966

theartofmoviestills:

Blow-Up | Michelangelo Antonioni | 1966

twistedtwinsproductions:

American Mary, the Smurfening. Ha, this is so hilarious to me.

twistedtwinsproductions:

American Mary, the Smurfening. Ha, this is so hilarious to me.

Jonathan Cott: Godard once said that movies are not a way to make money, they’re a way to spend money. Do you think it might be possible that the new technologies will eventually allow young filmmakers to make films again for a reasonable amount of money?

Francis Ford Coppola: Absolutely. Everybody will use it, everybody will make films, everybody will make dreams. That’s what I think is gonna happen. You’ll ship ‘em over to your friend, and he’ll ship one back. I think kids — sixteen- and twenty-year-olds today — I find them extremely bright and idealistic and ready to go. I think that, very shortly, there’s going to be a whole new way to approach things, and the designers and the architects and philosophers and artists are going to be the ones to help lead the society. And they’re the most qualified to do it.

Rolling Stone interview (Issue #365), March 18th, 1982.